Ask Holly: Flower Barrettes

BY  |  Wednesday, Mar 02, 2011 8:33am  |  COMMENTS (4)

Ready for spring? Yeah, me too. I have become a bit addicted to making flowers with felt after the recent success of the felt roses my daughter wore to school. I am making these for birthday party favors for my daughter’s upcoming birthday party, in lieu of goody bags. I mean, shouldn’t a “goody bag” be filled with something good and not a bunch of cheap plastic crap and some candy. These are super easy and inexpensive to make and they look  adorable clipped in hair or on a shirt as well.

Here is what you will need:

  • Felt in assorted colors ( The flowers above are done in hot pink, dark pink, purples, cream, orange and turquoise)
  • Beads or buttons
  • Scissors or pinking shears
  • Hot glue
  • Hair clips ( I like Con-air salon clips from CVS)

Felt and beads available at AC Moore or Michaels

Step 1: Cut one circle about 2 3/4″- 3″ in diameter and a smaller one in a different color about 2″ wide ( I traced the top of a jar with chalk)
Step 2: Draw five equal pie shapes on the circle as shown above
Step 3: cut the petal shapes on both the small and large  circles. They do not have to be perfect or even. Felt is very forgiving.
Step 4: Put the smaller flower on top of the bigger one so the petals are a bit staggered. Sew the bead or buttons in place.
Step 5: Cut a small felt circle. Clip the barrette to the circle. Now hot glue either side of the circle to the back of the flower. MAKE SURE THE BARRETTE OPENS THE CORRECT WAY BEFORE GLUEING.

Extras

FOR LEAF-cut a leaf shape out and hot glue it to the back of the flower.
FOR “DOGWOOD” FLOWER-cut five petals for the back piece and four for the front.
FOR ROUND BUTTON BACKING-cut a contrasting color circle with pinking shears or regular scissors and put it behind the button.

Here is a great alternative to making your own flowers (as well as my favorite birthday gift for little girls). My friend and very talented artist Jill Zalaski made two daisy clips for me from an old broken enamel pin that was my mother’s. I gave one to my niece and one to my daughter as an heirloom birthday present (they come in gorgeous hand sewn bags with hot pink ribbon). The blue flower is one of MANY pieces Jill has created for me. It was made from an old widowed earring that belonged to my grandmother. So go through your random jewelry drawer and dig out your old broken things you cannot part with and find out what she can do with them. I am a fairly creative person and she floors me every time with her designs. Oh, and she is very reasonably priced!

Questions? Just Ask Holly in comments.

4 Comments

  1. POSTED BY Stacey  |  March 02, 2011 @ 9:27 am

    LOVE, LOVE, LOVE it! You had me until you mentioned sew, but I suppose I could hot glue it it if I owned a hot glue gun. And, I MUST have something done by Jill. Those little Daisies are beautiful. And what a nice gift.

  2. POSTED BY Nancy Breslin  |  March 02, 2011 @ 1:06 pm

    Holly yours are quite precious- I will give it a try!!
    Stacey I am not a sewer either (but I have mastered the hot glue gun.)
    Another option which is of course not as lovely as home-made; is using the silk flowers from Michaels. I just saw some pretty new ones at Michaels in the scrapbooking section. They also have jewels in the middle.

  3. POSTED BY saras  |  March 02, 2011 @ 3:13 pm

    These are a really great idea. I’m definitely going to try them.

  4. POSTED BY hollykorusjenkins  |  March 02, 2011 @ 4:47 pm

    Come on ladies..I’m talking about a needle and a thread not firing up the sewing machine. I think I’m going to start a Crafting Boot Camp.

    Jill’s work it amazing I have almost cleaned out my random jewelry drawer from stuff I never wore to pieces I wear all of the time. Her pics on facebook are even better than her site.

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